10 Must-See Documentaries

The weather is getting a bit chilly, making it the perfect time to cozy up with your blankets and BumbleBars. On these cool fall nights, we love snuggling up to watch a good documentary! There are so many fascinating documentaries available through Netflix, Hulu, YouTube, etc. We made a list of our 10 favorite, must-see documentaries to share with you! Check it out:

Liz (CEO) Favorites:

• Meet the Patels – The film explores the expectations surrounding marriage in the Patels’ first-generation Indian immigrant family and in wider American society. Watch here.

• Last Days in Vietnam – During the chaotic final weeks of the Vietnam War, the North Vietnamese Army closes in on Saigon as the panicked South Vietnamese people desperately attempt to escape. On the ground, American soldiers and diplomats confront the same moral quandary: whether to obey White House orders to evacuate U.S. citizens only—or to risk punishment and save the lives of as many South Vietnamese citizens as they can. Watch here.

• Last Train Home – Last Train Home documents the Life of the Migrant Worker in China. Watch here.

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Hannah (Designer) Favorites:

• Indie Game: The Movie – Witness a portrait of a new breed of artist: the video game designer. At first, the only way to make it as a designer in the video game industry was to work with major developers. Now a new breed of independent auteurs has taken their industry by storm. Watch here.

• Winter on Fire – A civil rights movement erupts in the Ukraine after a peaceful student protest quickly morphs into a violent revolution. The Oscar-nominated Netflix documentary Winter on Fire: Ukraine’s Fight for Freedom presents viewers with a story of everyday citizens facing down brutal riot police controlled by Ukraine’s then-President Viktor Yanukovych, backed by Russian President Vladimir Putin. Watch here.

• BlackFish – The story of Tilikum, a captive killer whale that has taken the lives of several people, underscores problems within the sea-park industry, man’s relationship to nature, and how little has been learned about these highly intelligent mammals. Watch here.

• Batkid Begins – The documentary follows Miles Scott, an American child, and cancer survivor. His wish was to be “Batkid”, a sidekick of the eponymous comic book superhero Batman. Once the request went out, thousands of volunteers, city officials, businesses and supporters rallied to turn San Francisco, California into “Gotham City” – the fictional home city of Batman, on November 15, 2013. Watch here.

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Aimee (Office Guru) Favorites:

• Thank You Del – Thank You Del is the story if the godfather of improv comedy, Del Close, made with love by the UCB and director Todd Bieber. It should be noted that I was probably in the room while most of the live footage was shot at the Del Close Marathon. It was fun stuff. Read more here.

• On The Cusp, Off The Cuff – On The Cusp, Off The Cuff is a documentary about four New York area improvisers and their struggles toward success and recognition. Includes Sasheer Zamata, who was still two years away from being cast on SNL when she participated in this documentary by director Nate Dern. Watch here.

• We Cause Scenes – We Cause Scenes is about Improv Everywhere, the collective run by Charlie Todd what is responsible for the Annual No Pants Subway Ride and lots of other super cool, totally funny crowd-sourced happenings around the world. I participated in one where people were encouraged to help finish a relay race in Manhattan and then give interviews like they had just won. It was fun. Watch here.

Vegan vs Vegetarian

Did you know that veganism is not the same as vegetarianism? If you didn’t, you’re not alone. Many people don’t know, others tend to confuse the two, and some people have no idea what they even mean at all.

Shirt From RedBubble by Designer @meganbxiley

Buy Shirt at RedBubble from Designer @meganbxiley

BumbleBar is a strictly vegetarian facility. This means we never allow any kind of meat or dairy product through our doors. BumbleBar is also very close to being strictly vegan, however, we technically aren’t because we use honey in many of our products, including JunoBars. Honey is the only animal by-product that is allowed in our facility.

So, you can probably see the difference already. To be a vegetarian, you must exclude all meat from your diet. Vegetarians don’t eat animals, ever! To be a vegan, you must exclude all meat and animal by-products, including cheese, eggs, and milk. Vegans live on an exclusively plant-based diet.

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Are you a vegetarian? Try out our JunoBars, they’re fiber-rich and contain 5 – 7g of protein depending on the flavor. If you’re vegan, or would like to try the vegan lifestyle, we highly recommend trying our delicious BumbleBars. They’re a great snack full of organic energy and are 100% vegan-friendly.

Do you have advice for those beginning their new plant-eating lifestyle? We would love to hear from those of you who are veganism & vegetarianism experts! And for those of you who have questions about it, we want to hear from you too! Send us a message in the comments below or click here to tell us your story.

Happy Eating!
The BumbleBar Team

DIY Fall Art Projects

The leaves are changing color, the air is crisp, and there’s inspiration all around! Fall is the perfect time to pull out your old craft smock and get started on a few fun DIY art projects. Let’s take a look at several creative ideas from our BumbleBar crew.

How To Make: Hannah’s Cozy Coasters

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The brisk autumn weather makes this season the perfect time to walk outside. I find myself staring at the ground a lot as I’m walking around, observing the golden leaves and broken branches that have already fallen to the ground. It was on one of these walks last autumn with my mom that we were inspired to make coasters from the larger tree branches that were strewn across the road. Here is how you can make your own:

  • Collect a few large sticks that have already fallen from a tree. They should be about 2.5 – 5 inches in diameter.
  • Use a saw to cut the branch into small circles, about 1-2 inches apart. Follow these safety guidelines when cutting the tree branch.
  • Now, take sandpaper and sand the edges of the circles, so that the coaster is nice and smooth.
  • Last, paint the coasters with a clear, non-toxic gloss paint to keep them from absorbing any liquid that may be spilled on them.
  • When they’re dry, you’re all done! Ta-da!

How To Make: Aimee’s Splendid Scarf

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Fall is my favorite time to start and maybe finish a knitting project. I say maybe because it often takes me years to finish a project because I’ll get bored, or my hands will start to ache and I put it down and won’t pick it up again for another six months. That’s ok though, knitting is rarely a race to the finish line, since I already have many, many sweaters to keep me warm this winter. It’s not like I’ll freeze to death without the sweater I’m working on. I’ve finished more than six sweaters and tons of scarves and cowls that way. One of the best parts of knitting is getting to fantasize about all of the cool stuff you’ll make with the beautiful yarns that are available at the local yarn shop, or LYS as we knitters call them. My favorite LYS is Paradise Fibers. They are based in Spokane but ship worldwide and they have a wonderful selection of brands and colors as well as a helpful and experienced staff if I get stuck. Yarn, of course, is available at your local craft store like Michaels, but they almost never sell natural fibers, which I prefer. Synthetic fiber yarn absolutely has its place, though. It is inexpensive and often much easier to wash than animal fiber yarn, so it’s great for beginners who aren’t sure they want to commit to expensive yarn and for baby blankets and clothes, which will need to be washed fairly often.

The sweater pictured probably took me a year to finish. It is made with wonderful Debbie Bliss Alpaca Silk yarn that is soft and very warm. I found a relatively simple pattern on Patternfish by Knitting Pure and Simple. I’m not sure where I got the pattern for the cowl pictured. It’s just the same yarn doubled and knitted in a wide cable pattern. Knitty is another great place to look for knitting patterns and they’re all free! If you’re looking to start knitting, I’d pick out a simple pattern at Lion Brand Yarn and take that down to your LYS where they can help you pick out yarn and a needle to start out with. You can also take lessons or watch YouTube videos to learn the basic knit and purl moves. Even experienced pros like me refer to YouTube to get unstuck sometimes. My advice is to start knitting and figure out the rest on your feet, as you do it.

Good luck and happy knitting!

How To Make: Liz’s Fabulous Fruit Mandalas

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Fall Gardening with BumbleBar

Gardening is usually thought of as an activity one does throughout the spring or summer – but did you know that fall season is one of the best times to garden? The blazing summer sun is waning, so you don’t have to worry about beating the heat. Although, the sunshine is still warm enough to feel comfortable outside and it keeps the soil from freezing. We’ve made a list of plants that would be perfect to grow in your fall garden this season. Check it out!

Broccoli

1. Broccoli – It’s beneficial for broccoli seedlings to be planted around the last hot days of summer. The ground around them should be cool and moist! It takes a little over two months for a broccoli plant to completely mature.

2. Kohlrabi – Yum, Kohlrabi! My grandpa used to grow these in his garden often! They taste delicious and are a very low maintenance plant. They take about one to two months to mature and should be planted when the summer heat isn’t so severe.

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3. Radish – According to About Home, the radish is one of the easiest, quickest-growing crops you can grow in your garden. Whether you choose to grow them in a container or in a traditional garden bed, you can expect a harvest about one month after you sow the seeds — this is as close to instant gratification as gardening gets!

4. Lettuce – You can make room in your fall garden for this fan favorite, lettuce! Not only will this beautiful green plant make your garden look abundant and fresh, but you’ll also enjoy being able to plant them throughout the months of late August and September!

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5. Peas – Ed from Professional Gardening says, “Although most people plant their peas in the spring, this tasty vegetable can also be planted in the fall, as they are actually able to withstand snow and temperatures of -2°C. In mild winter climates, where the ground does not freeze, pea seeds can be sown directly into the garden from September through November to grow strong root systems and then bloom in spring. If you do not get your seeds planted in fall, plant as early as possible in the spring in a well-drained spot that offers some afternoon shade.”

Cozy Fall Favorite Recipes

Can you really believe it’s mid-September? It seems like only a couple weeks ago, I was putting my boots and scarves away, just to pull out my swimsuit and sunhat. Although it’s a bittersweet goodbye to summer, we can’t help but get giddy for fall! Fall means back to school and volleyball games, the smell of ripening orchards, pumpkins, and scarecrows, and all things cozy! To kick off this fall season with a bang we made a list of our team’s favorite fall recipes!

pumpkin-1Liz’s Best Roasted Pumpkin Seeds Ever!

• 2 cups raw pumpkin seeds
• 1-3 T Braggs liquid amino acids or GF tamarin or soy sauce
• 1-2 T chili powder

On medium heat in a large cast iron saute pan, roast pumpkin seeds until they are almost all popped. Stir often to avoid scorching. Pour in a couple of tablespoons of Braggs or tamari. Stir until liquid is evaporated. Sprinkle in chili powder. Turn off heat. Blend well. Remove from heat. Let cool. Enjoy!

P.S. Besides being a great healthy snack that people love, these pumpkin seeds make wonderful gluten-free croutons! They are also super tasty in soup.

 

Hannah’s Hot Buttered Rum (Vegan)

Hot Buttered Rum (Vegan)

(For 1 serving)

• 1 1/2 oz Earth Balance vegan buttery spread
• 1 1/4 oz simple syrup (1:1 organic raw cane sugar to water)
• A pinch of ground clove, nutmeg & sea salt
• 2 pinches of organic ground cinnamon
• 1 1/4 oz Blackwell Jamaican Rum (if 21+)
• 1/4 oz Smith & Cross rum or organic rum 
• 4 oz hot organic apple cider

Heat up to slowly melt butter and add simple syrup and spices. Now, add in the rums and apple cider. Last, pour into a heat-resistant glass.

Emory’s Vegan Chili

• Onions
• Bell Peppers
• Garlic
• Chili Powder
• Oregano
• Cumin
• Cayenne
• Chopped Tomatoes
• Hot Sauce

Add onions, bell peppers, and garlic; sauté until onions soften, about 10 minutes. Mix in chili powder, oregano, cumin, and cayenne; stir 2 minutes. Mix in beans, 1/2 cup reserved bean liquid, and tomato sauce. Bring chili to boil, stirring occasionally.

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Aimee’s Pumpkin Pie (This can be found at It Doesn’t Taste Like Chicken.com)

  • 1¾ Cups or 1 14 oz Can Pureed Pumpkin (not pumpkin pie filling)
  • ¼ Cup Maple Syrup
  • ½ CupOrganic Brown Sugar
  • ¾ Cup Full Fat Organic Canned Coconut Milk (stirred well before measuring)
  • 4 Tablespoons Organic Cornstarch
  • ½ teaspoon Salt
  • 2 teaspoons Pumpkin Pie Spice
  • ½ teaspoon Organic Cinnamon
  • 1 teaspoon Organic Vanilla Extract
  • 1 Recipe Easy Vegan Pie Crust or 1 Store Bought Pie Crust (check ingredients to make sure it is vegan) *Do not precook the pie crust
    Vegan Pumpkin Pie

    Preheat your oven to 350F (180C). Add all of the ingredients: the pureed pumpkin, maple syrup, brown sugar, coconut milk, cornstarch, salt, pumpkin pie spice, cinnamon, and vanilla extract to a blender or a large bowl. Mix well.Pour the pumpkin mixture into the uncooked pie crust. Spread evenly.Bake for 60 minutes. When you remove it from the oven, the edges might be slightly cracked and the middle will still look very wobbly. Let cool, and chill in fridge for a minimum of 4 hours until set, or overnight which is best.

Puzzled Produce

Did you know that many of the plants we eat on a daily basis are often categorized as something they’re not? When you were a child, you were probably shocked when someone first explained that a tomato was actually a fruit! (If no one told you that…well, you’re probably shocked right now!) Let’s uncover the other produce we’ve wrongly identified throughout the years….

1. The Tomatillo

Most people think of green Tomatillos as an unripe tomato, but in fact, they’re a different plant all together! Tomatillo is a small spherical shaped berry in the tomato family of fruits.

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2. The Cucumber

Wait a second…really?! Yes, the cucumber is also a fruit! The seeds inside the gourd make it an official member of the fruit family. “Why have we been calling it a vegetable our entire lives?” you may be asking. I guess you can chalk that up to culinary tradition. Does that mean pickles are a fruit too? Well, according to the U.S. Supreme Court, because they have seeds, pickles are also technically a “fruit of the vine”. (See source here.)

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3. The Pumpkin

Just like our friend the cucumber, pumpkins also grow on a vine and contain seeds inside the gourd. There’s no mistaking it – pumpkins are most definitely a variety of fruit. It really makes a lot of sense, if you think about it over a plate of warm, vegan pumpkin pie!

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4. The Avocado

This beautiful, delicious piece of produce is always on my grocery list. A great substitute for mayonnaise on sandwiches, a yummy dip for other vegetables (or are they fruit…?), and perfectly tasty on their own, avocados are downright heavenly. You would think that an avid avocado eater such as myself, would know whether or not this was a veggie or a fruit. Alas, I had no idea. After doing a bit of research, it turns out that this humble green snack is also a fruit. If you think about it, the large pit inside is very similar to that of an apricot or a plum.

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5. The Watermelon

If you’re waiting for me to tell you that the watermelon is a vegetable, I’m sorry but no, that’s not the case… although that would be very exciting news! The watermelon is indeed a fruit, like most of us (I hope) have always known. A fact that you may have been unaware of however, is that these giant melons are actually considered “berries.” According to Wikipedia, a melon is any of various plants of the family Cucurbitaceae with sweet edible, fleshy fruit. Botanically, a melon is a kind of berry, specifically a “pepo.” Very interesting!

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Keep The Kitchen (And Planet) Clean!

The kitchen is the headquarters of any home. It’s the hub of the house, where everyone can gather, talk, and relax. The kitchen can be a comforting space, where you can cook your grandmother’s favorite recipe time and time again. Or it can be an inspiring space, a place for you to invent a new dish, innovative and delicious. Whatever the case may be, we all need a clean, comfortable kitchen! Here are a few of our favorite “kitchen accessories” that are eco-friendly and earth conscious:

Method All Purpose Cleaner 

 Method uses the chemistry of PowerGreen® technology. Each squirt of cleaner, in all its lovely non-toxic glory, delivers a mighty cleaning punch with naturally derived, biodegradable ingredients. Its cleaners, derived from corn + coconut, break down dirt naturally, so every spray leaves nothing behind but a fresh scent + gleaming clean. Knock out dirt with the power of plants! At BumbleBar, we use this Beach Sage scent to clean our desk and computer workspaces, because it smells incredible! The scent is clean and fresh without any trace of chemical odor.

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Full Circle Tidy Organic Dish Cloths

These cute little dish cloths are made with 100% organic cotton, keeping things clean and green. They’re also made with non-toxic dyes!

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Bamboo Trio Utensil Set

These kitchen utensils are just beautiful. And to top it off, they’re certified organic bamboo, FDA- approved food-safe, chemical and pesticide-free; no bleaches or dyes, and the packaging is made from recycled or FSC paper and vegetable inks (just like BumbleBar products!)


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Beet Red Food Coloring Packet

Naturally vibrant decorative foods colors that are artificial dye-free! ColorKitchen’s non-GMO, vegan pigments are sourced from plants—not harmful synthetic substances made from petroleum. Bonus – this awesome food coloring comes from a fantastic, woman owned business!

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Mrs. Meyers Dish Soap

This soap is 97+% naturally derived and it smells amazing.

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Mixed Nut Medley BumbleBars

And last but not least, we have to mention our favorite Kitchen must-have! BumbleBars! And this month, our top pick is Mixed Nut Medley because it’s on sale for only $11.99! The perfect balance of roasted almonds and cashews makes for a bar with a rich, nutty flavor.

Organic, gluten free, plant based BumbleBars!

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What are your favorite eco-friendly kitchen products? Let us know in the comments below! Have a great week everyone!

Love,

The BumbleBar Team

Delicious, Nutritious, Gluten Free, Ethically Sourced, Kid Approved, Vegan Approved, Organic Energy, Sesame Snack Bars!
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